Morse Code Chart

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The Morse code chart is a type of code language that is used for transmitting rhythmic telegraphic information. In this Techspirited article, we shall learn more on Morse code, and the way alphabets and numbers are represented in it.

Samuel F.B. Morse created the Morse code in the early 1840s to send messages using the electric telegraph. It helped sending short electric signals as dots and long electric signals (three times longer) as dashes, with some embedded spaces. It was also known as the ‘American Morse Code’. Today, it is known as the Internationals Morse Code, as it is the refined code of the original.

During the early 1890s, it was used for radio communication. Then in the early 20th century, telegraph lines, undersea cables and radio circuits were all conducted in Morse code. The variable length of the alphabets made it very difficult to adapt to the automated circuits. It was soon replaced by Baudot code and ASCII. Today, in the professional fields, pilots and air traffic controllers are required to know and understand Morse code. VORs and NDBs, are navigational aids that are transmitted in Morse code.

Morse Code For Kids
Morse code can be taught to children as a fun and useful activity. The alphabets and numbers can be taught to them just like any other language. For this purpose, the following alphabet chart and number chart should prove to be handy.

Click on the tables to print.

Morse Code Alphabets Chart

Alphabet International Morse Code
A . _
B _ . . .
C _ . _ .
D _ . .
E .
F . . _ .
G _ _ .
H . . . .
I . .
J . _ _ _
K _ . _
L . _ . .
M _ _
N _ .
O _ _ _
P . _ _ .
Q _ _ . _
R . _ .
S . . .
T _
U . . _
V . . . _
W . _ _
X _ . . _
Y _ . _ _
Z _ _ . .

Morse Code Numbers Chart

Number International Morse Code
1 . – – – –
2 . . – – –
3 . . . – –
4 . . . . _
5 . . . . .
6 – . . . .
7 – – . . .
8 – – – . .
9 – – – – .
0 – – – – –

There are many Morse code charts that include punctuation, accented characters and procedural characters. This code has been used for over 165 years old, and is still widely used today for amateur radio or ham radio applications. Also, if you wish to pass on some secret letters to your friends then try using the Morse code. Its easy, fun and you even have online code converters and Morse code translators at your service. Just, SOS, "· · · - - - · · ·" your friends when you need them.

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